BREAKING Report: Voter Fraud Uncovered in Alabama Senate Race

Judge Roy Moore is calling for all the votes to be counted in the Alabama Senate election, refusing to concede the race to Doug Jones even as the mainstream media declares a premature victory.

Moore is down 1.7 points and only needs to come within a half-point to spark a statewide recount. Absentee ballots from military service members have still not been counted. Mobile County, a heavily pro-Jones county, tabulated its votes later than the pro-Moore counties, and eventually gave Jones the lead.

The Alabama Supreme Court shot down a lower court ruling Tuesday requiring counties to preserve their digital voting records. Thus, the Supreme Court is allowing counties to destroy their voter records. The Moore legal team will need to jump on this development fast to protect those records.

Evidence of voter fraud exists in the election.

Democratic activists made a last-minute push to get out the vote against Roy Moore in Alabama by encouraging “African-Americans in Mississippi” to vote in the wrong state.

Sources on the ground in Alabama confirm that these tactics are real, and they have been used by supporters of Democrat Doug Jones.

Big League Politics received evidence of a Reddit call for “African-Americans in Mississippi” to “make a short trip to Alabama on December 12.” That Reddit thread is still active.

Similar calls have been made on Reddit for African-Americans in other nearby states, including Georgia and Tennessee.

There was also a concerted effort underway to register felons to vote in the Alabama special election.

AL.com reports:

Thousands of felons across Alabama have registered to vote in recent weeks, according to Pastor Kenneth Glasgow, who is heading up a statewide effort to get felons to the voting booth.

Glasgow’s goal is to get as many felons as possible signed up to vote before the end of the day Monday, the deadline to be able to cast a ballot in Alabama’s Dec. 12 U.S. Senate special election…

For generations, most Alabamians convicted of a felony were barred from ever voting in the state again, but the Definition of Moral Turpitude Act, a new law passed by the state Legislature and signed by Gov. Kay Ivey in May, cleared the way for thousands of felons to restore their voting rights.